How to Celebrate Halloween During COVID-19

Each year, the POA receives questions from owners regarding Halloween/trick or treating activities on the Island. The POA does not determine whether or not the community participates in traditional Halloween/trick or treating activities normally held on October 31st.

We instead leave that up to the individual owners and their households. There are those who participate and those who do not. Some may choose to either not be at home or may turn off their porch lights, indicating that they don’t plan on participating or giving out treats.

The POA does not have any references in their governing documents regarding Halloween/trick or treating or the activities surrounding that tradition or other annual holiday traditions and how or if they are celebrated and by whom, other than establishing a time frame for removal of decorations/displays from the exterior of owner’s homes. This reference in our covenants relates to all holidays and religious or holiday symbols and decorations and states that they be removed within 30 days following the occurrence of the applicable holiday.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic this year, things in general are quite different and there is much uncertainty out there regarding holiday type celebrations.

The POA has reached out to the City of Charleston to see if they have created or disseminated any guidance, guidelines or ordinances regarding individual Halloween/trick or treating activities within neighborhoods in the City of Charleston and as of now, they have not. We are all aware of the guidelines regarding social distancing, wearing of masks, hand washing and sanitizing procedures and not participating in large gatherings, which is still being suggested by the city, state and CDC officials. Should the city or state mandate an ordinance regarding Halloween/trick or treating activities, we would abide by their ordinance. So for now, we will leave it up to individual owners/households to make the best decision for themselves as they determine the level of safety that they would want both at their home (giving out candy) or someone coming to their home.

The CDC recently released Halloween and other Holiday guidelines. For holiday guidance from the CDC, click HERE.

The CDC is encouraging Americans to avoid higher-risk Halloween activities in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. The CDC’s guidance reinforces that Halloween is happening and provides inspiration for creative and safe approaches to celebrating the holiday throughout the month of October. There’s no question that Halloween will look different this year. So for Halloween 2020 – we encourage you to make it safe, keep it fun, and still celebrate- but just a little differently this year!